Friday, October 9, 2009

Za Jian mien



Za Jian Mien for dinner today!!!! Took me 9 hours to upload cause i vaporized, ate three bowls of this and then passed out until now. I fell asleep in the 6th inning of the sawks game and missed it! Well, I wouldn't say I "missed" anything, damn 4-hit shutout....

Anyway, Za Jian Mien is from Beijing and its undergone a few permutations. In Beijing, its really salty and its 100% soybean paste with ground pork w/ cucumbers on noodles. In Taiwan, we throw a little sweet bean paste in. Korea does it too and I've seen it with peas, big pieces of cured tofu (tofu gan), but its wack. I have no idea what they are doing with it, but its not good. Japanese ramen places do it too and sometimes its good but I also never cared to figure out what they do to it so I can't say.



As for mine, I take small minced pieces of cured tofu, ground pork, 50/50 soy bean and sweet bean paste, cucumbers, noodles, serve noodles cold, pork mixture room temperature, game over!!!! Be prepared to food coma for 8 hours cause no one eats one bowl.

5 comments:

  1. It's like crack. Do you think you can devise a non-pork version so I can share this wonderful dish with B? I agree with you on the Korean one. I've tried it many times and it just doens't taste right.

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  2. Yea, I make it with non-pork for vegetarians. just use the tofu gan without pork. still tastes good. put it with some tomato and egg it will have plenty of flavor then. and use more soybean paste than hoisin since you don't have pork. the soybean is saltier

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  3. The Korean version's wack? Koreans say they're the ones who invented it!

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  4. I wish I could make this, I LOVE to cook :)

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  5. This dish is native to Beijing. Definitely not invented by Koreans, but plenty of people like their version. Just not my style. It is saltier and they chop the ingredients in sharper chunks. All preference.

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